Art

“Art is not what you see, but what you make others see.” 

Edgar Degas

Art at Kings Langley School

Art is an essential part of the development of young children and young adults. Art enables students to communicate artistic expression, personality, creativity and individuality. Art challenges us with different points of view, evokes opinions, compels us to empathise and relate to others and gives us the opportunity to express our response to a wide range of topics and areas. Like other areas of the arts, participation and engagement with art impacts academic and social success through developing cultural capital and providing students from a multitude of backgrounds and dispositions, the ability to show self-expression.

The arts curriculum at Kings Langley is designed to provide all students with opportunities to experience a range of materials, techniques and processes and exposure to differing movements and genres of art so that they can learn to appreciate the diverse directions that the subject can take them and transfer skills to other areas of the curriculum. The practical and technical skills of the developing art student are underpinned by the knowledge gained through Art history which allows students to value the ever-changing art world, from cave art through to modern day conceptualism.

The curriculum provision in art aims to provide students with the ability to acquire and then subsequently build upon strong foundations in knowledge of visual art, applied contextual and cultural understanding, practical creative and artistic skills, and conceptual and creative intelligence. Student’s progress from the varied experience of prior art education/provision in KS2 is accelerated through carefully planned fine art programme of study that builds confidence and proficiency in both making art as well as analysing and discussing art. Throughout KS3, KS4 and KS5 the main assessment objectives of ‘develop, refine/explore, record, and present’ are present through a constant interleaving curriculum design and spiral programme delivery that constantly encourages greater levels of sophistication and maturity in the main disciplines of drawing, painting, printing, mixed-media and 3D making skills.

Staff:

Mr J Tubb - Subject Leader
Miss S Arnold - Teacher of Art
Mr O Palmer - Teacher of Art
Mrs L Smith - Higher Level Teaching Assistant
Miss B Arthur - Art Technician

Curriculum Intent Objectives:

  • Produce diverse, creative work, exploring ideas and recording experiences to communicate personality, expression and creative intent.
  • Have a knowledge of and become proficient in a broad range of materials, techniques and processes including drawing, painting, printmaking and 3D techniques.
  • Evaluate and analyse creative works using the formal language of art, craft and design whilst developing self-expression.
  • Know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms.
  • Appreciate the impact of art, craft and design on all areas of life whilst valuing its impact of character development.
  • To understand the context in which artwork is made, the influences on artists, craft makers and designers, as well as the purpose of the work produced.
  • Develop a strong knowledge of formal elements that informs technical ability and skilful application.
  • Enabling students to reflect and evaluate their own work and that of others by critically analysing content, purpose and meaning.
  • To encourage the skills in creativity and innovation to produce artworks and visual outcomes that are informed by knowledge which feeds purpose and intent.

Implementation:

  • Pupils are able to access and enjoy an engaging curriculum which is encourages creativity and develops personality by meeting the individual needs of all students from all backgrounds, ability and dispositions.
  • Provide fully inclusive learning environments that encourages a positive climate where students are able to take risks and enjoy learning new knowledge and skills.
  • To allow students to appreciate the opportunity to gain an exciting insight into the world of art through exploring historical periods and movements through to contemporary practice.
  • Giving students opportunities to develop their character by referring to historical and contemporary issues addressed or covered in art, craft and design.
  • Providing students to engage with the subject by providing extra-curricular opportunities that enhance their knowledge, appreciation and cultural capital through clubs, groups, and trips to galleries, museums and other places of subject interest.
  • Supporting student leadership and student voice by including students in the development of an engaging and interesting curriculum.
  • Including contemporary practices such as digital media and photography alongside traditional art techniques and processes.
  • The delivery of GCSE and A-Level Art and A-Level Photography.

Impact:

  • Having a creative mind and the ability to visual express opinions and thoughts.
  • Being able to apply creative thinking skills to other areas of the curriculum and daily life.
  • The ability to recognise character traits of artists and creative people through decoding symbols and visual references of circumstances and situations.
  • A developed level of appreciation for Art and culture.
  • Have an interest in the arts.
  • Leave school with a knowledge of influence periods of art history which can assist in understanding political, environmental, sociocultural, and economical situations.

Art KS3/KS4/KS5 Summary:

Year 7 Rationale:

Introductory coverage of the four AO provides the foundations for interleaving within Yr.7 with consistent and regular delivery of arts education that is progressive towards KS4 programme of study, then subsequently KS5 and beyond. Students have four projects within this year in order to motivate and inspire them as well as cultivate confidence in their artistic and creative ability. The subject content and themes for projects provide students with solid foundations to the areas that are then built upon in subsequent year groups.

Baseline testing – Assessment of student’s capability within foundation elements of art (knowledge, understanding and application of formal elements) in both visual and written forms. The assessment of which informs planning for progression and curriculum content and delivery within all the subsequent projects for this year.

Colour theory and application – the principle skills of painting and drawing are made within this unit of study where well known artists, movements/genres of art are explored to provide students with basic foundation knowledge in which to contextualise learning of both theoretical and practical art. Confidence within these materials, techniques and processes are initiated and built upon through the interleaving approach throughout the year. It is also an important factor in students acquiring the necessary knowledge and understanding of formal elements for all further study in this subject area.

AO1 – Transcription and analysis of artists work in relation to the theory and application of colour.
AO2 – Students can produce imaginative and personal work that applies the practical knowledge associated to painting.
AO3 – Skilful use of watercolour painting in relation to various painting exercises to reproduce formal elements.
AO4 – Final outcome relating to the knowledge gained within this project as well as the practical application of this knowledge in a creative outcome.

Portraiture – students acquire an understanding of confidence of application of formal ‘rules’ of art and progress their understanding of a range of approaches to art which both respect and challenge the formalities of fine art. Within this project students will explore a range of approaches to drawing which is one of two compulsory skills that students require as they underpin all other areas of producing art. A final piece where students produce a clay outcome provides an introduction to 3D making skills, something that is then built upon in subsequent projects across KS3.

AO1 – Transcription and analysis of artists work in relation to formal and stylised/abstracted forms of portraiture.
AO2 – Students develop personal and creative outcomes that apply their knowledge of portraiture (both formal and stylised/abstracted).
AO3 – Skilful and varied use of materials to produce visual outcomes exploring portraiture.
AO4 – Students produce a final outcome that shows knowledge and understanding of portraiture using 3D making processes and techniques.

Cultural Studies – Introducing a cultural area of art provides students with the opportunity to see the wider role of art and creativity within a socio-cultural context. The role that visual art plays in cultural celebration, importance of values, codes and communication through a visual channel provides students with a wider appreciation of how art goes beyond purely aesthetics and where it has a function in society. This is an ideal opportunity to begin promoting other areas of the arts and how an understanding of other cultures increases cultural capital in students. The area of culture to be selected range from aboriginal art to hieroglyphics however the fundamental concept of this PoS is to ensure that students learn the chronological position and impact of the main influencing movements and artists of the art world. Teachers may want to focus on a culture from a specific period of time such as Gothicism, Baroque or the Medieval Ages however students will gain an understanding of where this period of art fits into the overall chronology of the art world. A key component for this is to provide context to how it relates to contemporary influences.

AO1 – Students can discuss through visual and written forms, the ideology and context of the artwork being studied.
AO2 – Students use their knowledge and understanding of the cultural area of study to develop their own ideas and responses to a fine art brief.
AO3 – Students explore materials, techniques and processes that enable them to produce accurate outcomes showing intent.
AO4 – Highly creative and imaginative final outcomes show how a deep-rooted understanding of the cultural area of study has informed their final outcome(s).

Year 8 Rationale:

Increased coverage of the four AO encourages the development of skill set required for art and creative education which extends the transition towards the KS4 programme of study, then subsequently KS5 and beyond. Students have two projects within this year group to gain further understanding about how to produce a thorough response to a starting point – a key understanding required at KS4 and beyond. Yr.8 students have the least timetabled lessons out of all year groups so it is imperative that skill development and knowledge acquisition is explicit and covers the assessment areas.

Hundertwasser – Students explore the role of an artist in the wider sense of purpose and position within society and how visual language is used to communicate values and ideology. Students build upon their knowledge of the formal elements gained in Yr.7 but with more analysis of application and a focus on creativity so that they can produce outcomes with intention and showing influence of knowledge acquired in this project. Students extend their drawing and painting skills within this project but they will also begin to explore techniques associated with mixed-media art. The introduction of mixed-media provides students with opportunities to gain further confidence in materials, techniques and processes that may be unknown to them.

AO1 – Students can communicate how an artist uses art to vehicle for convey and express values and beliefs.
AO2 – Students explore how materials, techniques and processes can be creatively used to produce imaginative artwork.
AO3 – Development of drawing and painting skills in addition to the appropriate application of mixed-media to communicate artistic intention.
AO4 – Students produce an informed final outcome that shows influences from own and others work.

Still Life & Man Made – Students require a solid understanding of the varying approaches to drawing and mark-making. In this project students increase their knowledge of the formalities and ‘rules’ within art such as composition, direction of light, form, etc. Students will produce a range of studies and artwork that builds on prior drawing experience. The project provides an ideal contrast to the previous one where the topic is man-made; an ideal juxtaposition that shows how the art world is informed by both natural and man-made influences.

AO1 – Students can produce and discuss how formal elements are used within art and the appropriateness of materials, techniques and processes when producing visual work.
AO2 – Students reflect upon the work of others in order to produce creative work that shows both influence and independence.
AO3 – Students develop their ability to use a more diverse range of drawing and mark-making techniques to produce visual work which is supported through written recording.
AO4 – Students use preparatory work to produce highly creative outcomes which are informed by the work of studied artists and other stimulus.

Figurative Art – Throughout history the figure has been captured and represented by humans and artist for a variety of reasons. The figure is a popular area of where artists have used it as inspiration and a medium over thousands of years. Limitless in its scope for exploration, this project introduces students to a variety of artists who have represented the human form in both purist form and in expressionist form. Within this project students will explore the mathematical links and references to proportion and scale whilst also understanding how artists use creative freedom to represent the human form with artistic expression.

AO1 – Students can recognise the need for formality and use of rules when producing purist representational art as well as the freedom of expression when producing art.
AO2 – Students explore how expression and understanding of formal elements can be used to produce highly personalised visual outcomes.
AO3 – Students develop their ability to communicate in a variety of forms to show an appreciation of the formal elements whilst showing creative intent.
AO4 – Students can produce final outcomes that are indicative of directed and personal explorations into the human and figurative form.

Year 9 Rationale:

The focus for the Yr.9 programme of study is to encourage confidence and understanding of the four AO. The projects are designed to provide a solid introduction to how projects are delivered at GCSE level and provide insight into how an artist works from ‘project launch’ to final outcome. Students have three projects within this year group. The projects are designed as an informer for the GCSE course and the content of the Yr.9 PoS provides the foundations for development in KS4.

Pop Art – Students explore this exciting and interesting movement within art which is informed massively by contemporary culture. The socio-cultural elements of this movement of art are used as a vehicle to engage students in the role of art as a contemporary art form and research that informs students work comes from an exploration into contemporary displays of culture and society. Students use their own exposure to art, design and culture to produce work that is highly reflective of today’s world. Painting, drawing, mixed-media and 3D outcomes are all produced in this project with a focus on appropriateness of materials, techniques and processes. Creative outcomes are highly personal and informed by student’s knowledge acquisition, areas of research and selection of materials, techniques and processes. An expectation of students is to show an increased understanding of the role of art in the contemporary world and how it informs our cultural capital.

AO1 – Students develop their knowledge of art as a cultural, social, and historical component of how people view the wider world and how they can relate to art in the contemporary realms.
AO2 – Students show how they can use everyday items to inform their own artwork and how they can create art for purpose.
AO3 – Students develop their ability to produce artwork that communicates values in both 2D and 3D formats showing increasingly mature and sophisticated application of materials, techniques and processes.
AO4 – Students produce a final outcome that communicates the concept and ideology of the Pop Art movement whilst expressing original and personal ideas.

Landscapes & Architecture – This project gives students further exposure to the formalities sometimes required in art. Students require the skills of understanding depth and spatial awareness as well as understanding scale and perspective. In this project students employ a range of materials, techniques and processes to produce outcomes across a variety of art disciplines in order to further their skill and confidence. Paintings that explore linear and aerial perspective, drawings of architecture in order to communicate scale and perspective, and the exploration of artists who specialise in landscape and architecture, all provide students with the opportunity to appreciate the value of mathematics in creating accurate and realistic works of art.

AO1 – Students use the analysis and evaluation of work by others to inform their knowledge and understanding of formal approaches to fine art.
AO2 – Students use experimentation to build an awareness of the formalities in fine art. They experiment with various approaches to producing artwork in order to gain confidence in producing work that meets the formalities of art whilst embracing creativity.
AO3 – Students develop their level of accuracy when producing artwork; acknowledging how mathematics and formal ‘rules’ are used to inform art.
AO4 – Students develop their ability to use artistic influence, creativity and sources of primary imagery to inform their artistic response.

Pattern and Printmaking – Within this project students are exposed to a technically demanding area of art which requires the application of a variety of skills. Students will produce artwork from direct observation, explore how artists stylise interpretations of the natural world to produce original artwork, abstract their original artwork into stylised designs that are then translated into a lino-print design. Students will develop the understanding of a hands-on practical process which will require a fully comprehensive and detailed understanding of both; how art is developed stylistically and the lino-printmaking process.

AO1 – Students develop their ability to transform traditional artwork into stylised pieces of print work.
AO2 – Students can take imaginative and creative risks with their work by producing artwork that is informed by an understanding of the materials, technique and processes.
AO3 – Students develop a sophisticated understanding of artistic development and experiment with a complicated mark-making process of lino-printing.
AO4 – Students produce highly developed and informed pieces of artwork that are created with significant levels of individuality and use of personal exploration.

KS4 Rationale:

Foundation studies in GCSE – Students are introduced to the GCSE course and are guided in how to produce work that meets the expectations and standards required at GCSE level. Within this section of the course students will be introduced to the assessment criteria and explanations of how to meet the criteria is made explicit to students. Students undertake the following activities:

  • Research skills.
  • Analysis and evaluation of work by others.
  • Exploring and experimenting with materials, techniques and processes to produce artwork..
  • Recording through producing artwork.
  • Recording opinions, thoughts and reflections through annotation of work.
  • Developing and refining ideas to produce creative and personal outcomes showing intention.

Students are guided through this section of the course and this is supported by a student handbook for students to refer to when completing the programme of study.

Natural forms part 1 – Students are introduced to the unit 1 portfolio component and are guided through the completion of preparatory work that meets the assessment criteria. Students produce a series of ‘boards’ that respond to the theme of natural forms including; flowers/leaves, fruit and vegetables, fish and shells, skulls and bones. Students use a range of materials, techniques and processes to produce high-quality artwork with supporting annotations to record their responses to the theme. Students produce a main preparatory board for each area of natural form, a refinement board and a creative outcome that explores a different material, technique and process. This allows students to experiment and explore a range of approaches to inform their ideas for developing a final outcome(s). By students repeating this process they gain a secure understanding of what they will be required to do in part 2 of the project and can master a range of techniques through the interleaving approach.

Natural forms part 2 – Part 2 of the natural forms project requires students to select their theme, using their strongest area produced in part 1. Students then respond to the requirements of the project by completing explorative work for their chosen theme, in the same manner as part 1. Students are guided on what is required and work through a series of checklists. Students will gain a thorough understanding of how to respond to stimulus in a mature, personal and informed way. Parts 1 and 2 are assessed using the assessment criteria grid provided by the examination board. An important element of this phase is to introduce and/or enhance photographic skills of students so that it informs both their GCSE work and produces foundation skills for any student continuing on to A-Level Fine Art or A-Level Photography.

Externally Set Task (EST) – The EST is the examination paper that is released by the exam board and provides students with a theme and indicative starting points. Students are given ten weeks to produce preparatory studies and complete research to support the final outcome(s) which is produced within a ten-hour examination period. The ten hours of sustained focus is under examination conditions which is invigilated by members of the art department.
Students are provided guidance on what is required within the preparatory work which is organised in the same manner as the unit 1 portfolio component. Students work is assessed against the assessment criteria provided by the examination board.

KS5 Rationale:

Foundation studies in A-Level – In order for students to make the transition to A-Level and meet the standards and expectations at this level, students are taken through a series of investigative activities that mature their skills with a focus on sophistication and depth of knowledge. Students are encouraged to develop their independent working and produce work that is informed through contextual research, in-depth evaluation, reflection and analysis of own and others work. These skills are utilised within the related study component. Having a spiralled approach to the foundation studies allows students to reflect upon the existing knowledge and application of skill and appreciate how this can be built upon and refined to show a level of sophistication. The same skill areas are developed for A-Level as the GCSE. The skills are introduced in KS3 and then continuously built upon throughout KS3, KS4 and KS5.

  • Research skills.
  • Analysis and evaluation of work by others.
  • Exploring and experimenting with materials, techniques and processes to produce artwork.
  • Recording through producing artwork.
  • Recording opinions, thoughts and reflections through annotation of work.
  • Developing and refining ideas to produce creative and personal outcomes showing intention.

Surfaces part 1 (Component 1) – Following the foundation studies where students are taken through the activities with guidance and structure students move into the primary phase of the project titled ‘Surfaces’. During this phase students are provided with stimulus to respond to and teachers provide some guidance on the completion of the work which is given out in a ‘student brief’ style. It is up to students to respond to the brief using the skills acquired in the foundation section of the project. Assessment of the students work is made by the teachers against the formal assessment criteria and students receive in-depth feedback on how they have applied the required skills, shown knowledge and shown an application of knowledge in both written and visual work.

Surfaces part 2 (Component 1) – Students move into the second phase of the ‘Surfaces’ project where they are now required to show independence through selecting their own artists, materials, techniques and processes to respond to the theme of ‘Surfaces’. Whilst students are to structure their own response and organise their own stimulus the teacher(s) provides tutorials to ensure that the project shows the required level of development and meets the assessment criteria. The project is designed in this way to ensure students can achieve the top levels for each assessment objective which details that students need to show ‘informed ideas are fully and maturely developed’ and ‘personal and meaningful response showing sophisticated and mature realisation of intentions’.

Surfaces part 3 (Component 1) – This is the final phase of the ‘Surfaces’ project which requires students to produce ideas for a final outcome(s) that shows a development and refinement of ideas. Students will then produce their final outcome(s) in the trial exam period where they have fifteen-hour exam period of sustained focus under examination conditions which is invigilated by members of the art department.

Related Study (Component 2) – A requirement of the A-Level Fine Art qualification is a written essay exploring an area of art selected by the student. The study supports the practical portfolio of work and both should provide context to each other. Students employ the research, analytical, reflection and evaluation skills developed from KS3 up to KS5. Students are given a structure to work to and are provided tuition where feedback is provided against the assessment criteria. A student handbook is provided to assist students in the completion of this component.

Externally Set Task (EST) - The EST is the examination paper that is released by the exam board and provides students with a theme and indicative starting points. Students are given ten weeks to produce preparatory studies and complete research to support the final outcome(s) which is produced within a fifteen-hour examination period. The fifteen hours of sustained focus is under examination conditions which is invigilated by members of the art department.
Students are provided guidance on what is required within the preparatory work which is organised in the same manner as the unit 1 portfolio component. Students work is assessed against the assessment criteria provided by the examination board.

Photography Curriculum Overview:

Foundation studies ‘Seeing Themselves’ – In order for students to develop a strong base of knowledge and skill set within the discipline of photography the foundation studies section of the curriculum is designed to provide a fully comprehensive introduction to the subject and where students can gain confidence in the terminology/vocabulary, equipment, and requirements of the subject. Students are provided with a wide range of activities that expose them to the vast and exciting world of photography. Foundation studies is delivered through three approaches; technique and equipment workshops, seminar sessions in contextual studies, and student project brief. This approach provides students with exposure to practical experience, knowledge and understanding of written communication in photography as well as the skills to answer a brief.

‘Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow’ part 1 (Component 1) – Students are given the title theme of ‘Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow’ in which to develop a personal, creative and independent response to. In this part of the PoS students are guided through the requirements of a photography portfolio and receive high-level support in achieving the components for a response to the brief. This section of the PoS gives students confidence in the assessment criteria as well as understanding how to apply and show their growing knowledge of technical photography, creative intentions and using research and contextual studies to inform a creative response. This part of the PoS provides the foundations for the next two parts where students gain knowledge of how to develop and refine their skills.

‘Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow’ part 2 (Component 1) – In part one students acquired the knowledge and understanding of recording photographic ideas and creativity. Within this part students are increasing their knowledge of photography as well as building a portfolio of highly personal work. This work is informed through the students increasing awareness of contextual studies which is knowledge driven and takes into account personal investment and interest in the students own learning (self-regulated learning). Students produce highly creative and informed responses in three different genres of photography in order to help them consider how their knowledge can be applied in a professional manner showing consideration of the context of the work.

‘Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow’ part 3 (Component 1) – This is the final phase of the ‘Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow’ portfolio project brief which requires students to produce ideas for a final outcome(s) showing a sophisticated and mature development and refinement of ideas. Students will then produce their final outcome(s) in the trial exam period where they have fifteen-hour exam period of sustained focus under examination conditions which is invigilated by members of the art/photography department.

Related Study (Component 2) – A requirement of the A-Level Photography qualification is a written essay exploring an area of art selected by the student. The study supports the practical portfolio of work and both should provide context to each other. Students may wish to select an area previously studied within the seminar lessons which form part of the foundation studies section to base their related study on. They may alternatively use contextual research as stimulus and focus. Students employ the research, analytical, reflection and evaluation skills developed since the start of this A-Level. Students are given a structure to work to and are provided tuition where feedback is provided against the assessment criteria. A student handbook is provided to assist students in the completion of this component.

Externally Set Task (EST) - The EST is the examination paper that is released by the exam board and provides students with a theme and indicative starting points. Students are given ten weeks to produce preparatory studies and complete research to support the final outcome(s) which is produced within a fifteen-hour examination period. The fifteen hours of sustained focus is under examination conditions which is invigilated by members of the art/photography department.
Students are provided guidance on what is required within the preparatory work which is organised in the same manner as the unit 1 portfolio component. Students work is assessed against the assessment criteria provided by the examination board.

Reading in Art:

The Art department has a well-stocked art library located in F205 with books that cover all areas of the curriculum and beyond. The department also has three student art librarians who maintain this library and can recommend students on specific books associated to their projects.

The following books are general books for all years

The Art Book: Big Ideas Simply Explained, ISBN-10: 9780241239018
Art: The Definitive Visual Guide, ISBN-10: 0241257107
The Story of Art, ISBN-10: 0714832472
30,000 Years of Art: The Story of Human Creativity across Time and Space, ISBN-13: 978-0714877297

Recommended reading list

Places to visit:

Examples of places to visit